Fear and hoping: Adding hope to health messages may motivate better behaviors

By Newsroom America Staff at 23 Feb 17:09

While fear about health concerns may grip people, adding a little hope to a message might make people more willing to take preventative actions, according to researchers.

Children's learning is not affected by repeated sick days with fever and infections

23 Feb 15:07 | World

A fevered and listless child with ear pain, a bad cough or snot running out of their nose is a well-known phenomenon in most families with children. But even when one sick day leads to another, and collecting prescriptions at the pharmacy becomes a routine, parents need not to worry that their children´s brain are affected or they are losing the ability to do well in school.read more »

Study: Police use of force is rare, as are significant injuries to suspects

23 Feb 14:04 | U.S. News

Police officers rarely use force in apprehending suspects, and when they do they seldom cause significant injuries to those arrested, according to a multi-site study.read more »

China's two-child policy may exacerbate gender inequality

23 Feb 14:02 | World

Since China ended its one-child policy allowing all families to have up to two children, an additional 90 million women have become eligible to have a second child. But new UBC sociology research suggests the new universal two-child policy could be negatively affecting women's status and gender equality.read more »

The good and bad health news about your exercise posts on social media

22 Feb 17:22 | U.S. News

We all have that Facebook friend -- or 10 -- who regularly posts photos of his or her fitness pursuits: on the elliptical at the gym, hiking through the wilderness, crossing a 10K finish line. read more »

Neanderthals were artistic like modern humans, study indicates

22 Feb 15:17 | World

Scientists have found the first major evidence that Neanderthals, rather than modern humans, created the world's oldest known cave paintings - suggesting they may have had an artistic sense similar to our own. read more »

Weather should remain predictable despite climate change

22 Feb 14:16 | U.S. News

Research from the University of Missouri suggests that even as rising carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere drive the climate toward warmer temperatures, the weather will remain predictable.read more »

Brain size of human ancestors evolved gradually over 3 million years

22 Feb 14:04 | World

Modern humans have brains that are more than three times larger than our closest living relatives, chimpanzees and bonobos. Scientists don't agree on when and how this dramatic increase took place, but new analysis of 94 hominin fossils shows that average brain size increased gradually and consistently over the past three million years.read more »

Fake news 'vaccine': Online game may 'inoculate' by simulating propaganda tactics

21 Feb 17:14 | World

A new online game puts players in the shoes of an aspiring propagandist to give the public a taste of the techniques and motivations behind the spread of disinformation - potentially "inoculating" them against the influence of so-called fake news in the process.read more »

Smartphones are bad for some teens, not all

21 Feb 16:11 | U.S. News

Is the next generation better or worse off because of smartphones? The answer is complex and research shows it largely depends on their lives offline.read more »

Europe's cities face more extreme weather than previously thought

21 Feb 16:08 | World

Research by Newcastle University, UK, has for the first time analysed changes in flooding, droughts and heatwaves for all European cities using all climate models and it shows they face more extreme weather than previously thought.read more »

Assassination of political leaders connected to increase in social conflict

21 Feb 16:04 | U.S. News

An increase in social conflict increases the likelihood of assassinations of political leaders, according to new research co-conducted by faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York.read more »

Innuendo and pointing suspicion in news coverage can fuel conspiracy theories

20 Feb 17:16 | World

Innuendo and hinting at fake information in news coverage is enough to fuel belief in conspiracy theories, new research shows. read more »

Hitting rock bottom after job loss can be beneficial, study shows

20 Feb 16:24 | U.S. News

We've all heard it said, "When you hit rock bottom, there's nowhere to go but up." This can prove especially true in business, where bottoming out as a result of job loss can be necessary before finding the radical solution that will lead to a new work identity, according to new research.read more »

Land use change has warmed the Earth's surface

20 Feb 16:07 | World

Natural ecosystems play a crucial role in helping combat climate change, air pollution and soil erosion. A new study by a team of researchers from the Joint Research Centre, the European Commission's science and knowledge service, sheds light on another, less well-known aspect of how these ecosystems, and forests in particular, can protect our planet against global warming.read more »

Illinois researchers find tweeting in cities lower than expected

20 Feb 16:01 | U.S. News

Studying data from Twitter, University of Illinois researchers found that less people tweet per capita from larger cities than in smaller ones, indicating an unexpected trend that has implications in understanding urban pace of life.read more »

Consumer and industrial products now a dominant urban air pollution source

19 Feb 17:21 | U.S. News

Chemical products that contain compounds refined from petroleum, like household cleaners, pesticides, paints and perfumes, now rival motor vehicle emissions as the top source of urban air pollution, according to a surprising NOAA-led study.read more »

Global dividends break new record in 2017, with more to come for the year ahead

19 Feb 15:18 | World

A strengthening world economy and rising corporate confidence pushed global dividends to a new high in 2017, according to the Janus Henderson Global Dividend Index.read more »

Earthquakes follow wastewater disposal patterns in southern Kansas

19 Feb 15:11 | U.S. News

Wastewater created during oil and gas production and disposed of by deep injection into underlying rock layers is the probable cause for a surge in earthquakes in southern Kansas since 2013, a new report in the Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America concludes.read more »

Asteroid 'time capsules' may help explain how life started on Earth

19 Feb 15:06 | World

In popular culture, asteroids play the role of apocalyptic threat, get blamed for wiping out the dinosaurs - and offer an extraterrestrial source for mineral mining.read more »

Humans will actually react pretty well to news of alien life: scientist

16 Feb 17:07 | U.S. News

As humans reach out technologically to see if there are other life forms in the universe, one important question needs to be answered: When we make contact, how are we going to handle it? Will we feel threatened and react in horror? Will we embrace it? Will we even understand it?read more »

How #MeToo, awareness months and Facebook are helping us heal

16 Feb 15:33 | World

If we have learned anything on social media in 2017 it's that everything isn't okay. Far from it. But we are finally starting to talk about it - according to researchers at Drexel University who study our relationships with social network sites.read more »

Can't get an image out of your head? Your eyes are helping to keep it there

16 Feb 14:27 | U.S. News

Even though you are not aware of it, your eyes play a role in searing an image into your brain, long after you have stopped looking at it.read more »

High levels of microplastics found in Northwest Atlantic fish

16 Feb 14:23 | World

A new study sheds light on the magnitude of microplastic pollution in our oceans. The study found microplastics in the stomachs of nearly three out of every four mesopelagic fish caught in the Northwest Atlantic -- one of the highest levels globally.read more »

Eye exams linked to kids' reading levels

15 Feb 17:07 | World

Elementary school children who read below grade level may have challenges with their eyesight even if standard tests show they see 20/20, according to a new study from the University of Waterloo.read more »

Study dispels notion social media displaces human contact

15 Feb 15:12 | U.S. News

Echoing concerns that grew with the World Wide Web itself a decade earlier, the rise of social media has stoked fears of "social displacement" -- the alienation of people from friends and family in favor of Facebook and Twitter.read more »

More than 10,000 civilians killed or injured in Afghanistan conflict last year

15 Feb 13:47 | World

A total of 10,453 civilian casualties – 3,438 people killed and 7,015 injured – were documented in the 2017 Annual Report by the UN Assistance Mission in Afghanistan (UNAMA) and the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR).read more »

TV's influence on pregnancy, childbirth more powerful than many women admit

15 Feb 13:29 | U.S. News

Surfing through cable TV channels often results in catching a glimpse of a woman giving birth or preparing for motherhood in one of the popular pregnancy and childbirth reality shows.read more »

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